Phoenix Concerts: Arizona State Fair 2013 Concert Lineup; Oct. 12 – Nov. 2 (photos)

MOJO Nov. 2013

Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall is inextricably of L.A. The exterior of Disney Hall. More photos A remarkable work of public architecture, it reflects and engages Los Angeles like few other buildings. Photography by Los Angeles Times staff Sept. 20, 2013 In a lecture at Harvard in the early 1990s, the Spanish architect Rafael Moneo referred to Frank Gehry as a “noble savage.” The comment, partly a joke, perfectly summed up the conventional wisdom that had gathered around Gehry’s work during the time he was designing Walt Disney Concert Hall. As the prevailing caricature had it, Gehry was architecture’s answer to the action painters of the 1950s: Jackson Pollock operating at an urban scale, working as much by intuition as strategy, and dribbling his unorthodox forms across building sites instead of canvases. The building, which will turn 10 years old next month, responds to the lonely moonscape urbanism of Bunker Hill with a shimmering, canny gregariousness that spills down Grand Avenue in both directions. It understands and adapts to its peculiar context far better than the buildings by well-known architects that preceded (Arata Isozaki’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Moneo’s cathedral) and followed it (Coop Himmelblau’s arts high school) on Grand. And thanks to Gehry’s productive collaboration with the acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota, Disney Hall solves the devilish practical challenges that have frustrated a long line of concert-hall architects. Its auditorium, lined with a billowing collection of Douglas fir panels and seats upholstered in an almost-garish floral pattern that dares you to dislike it, delivers a remarkably and reliably lively sound. In short, Disney Hall accomplishes all the things Gehry has become famous for and all the things he was supposed to be incapable of doing. Disney Hall under construction in 2001. More photos When Gehry was named one of the finalists in the competition to design a new building for the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1988, he was keenly aware of the typical objections to his work. In an early presentation of his proposal, he made a point of saying that his buildings “aren’t from Mars.” He emphasized how much his career was “bound to this city.” He was, in fact, the only local architect among the four finalists. His initial design, quite different from what was ultimately built, imagined a small village for classical music at the top of Bunker Hill.

Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall is inextricably of L.A.

19. (Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP, file) Taylor Swift FILE – In this March 2, 2012 file photo, Taylor Swift performs on stage at the Burswood Dome during the opening night of her “Speak Now” Australian tour in Perth, Australia. Multi-platinum selling superstar Taylor Swift is releasing her fourth studio album called Taylor Swift FILE – In this Aug. 7, 2011 file photo, singer Taylor Swift arrives at the Teen Choice Awards in Universal City, Calif. Swift wears a white halter-style dress just like Marilyn Monroe’s dress in “The Seven Year Itch.” Monroe passed away a half-century ago this week, a murky death that remains one of Hollywood’s most tantalizing mysteries. But look around: Her legend lives on, more vibrantly than ever. In a twist she surely would have appreciated, this 1950’s bombshell has become a 21st-century pop culture phenom. (AP Photo/Dan Steinberg, File) Taylor Swift Taylor Swift arrives at the Teen Choice Awards on Sunday, July 22, 2012, in Universal City, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP) Taylor Swift Grammy award winning artist Taylor Swift performs during the Walmart Stores Inc. shareholders’ meeting in Fayetteville, Ark., Friday, June 1, 2012. (AP Photo/April L. Brown) Taylor Swift In this Nov. 20, 2012 photo, Taylor Swift arrives at the 39th Annual American Music Awards in Los Angeles. Swift is donating $4 million to the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum to fund the 7,500 square foot-plus Taylor Swift Education Center in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello) Taylor Swift Taylor Swift poses backstage with the award for entertainer of the year at the 47th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards on Sunday, April 1, 2012 in Las Vegas.

Taylor Swift’s Tour Rises To No. 1 On Pollstar’s Concert Rankings

Rodriguez, who came to Carcasses’ defense amid the controversy, included the 41-year-old pianist and leader of the jazz-fusion band Interactivo in his line-up of artists Friday at an open-air concert in the Havana neighborhood of Santiago de las Vegas. Without making any mention of the controversy swirling around Carcasses, Rodriguez presented his fellow musician as a “talent” and recalled that they worked together recently on an album. During Friday’s show, Carcasses provided piano accompaniment for Rodriguez on his song “Segunda Cita” and also performed two other instrumental numbers with other musicians. Carcasses did not make any remarks to the crowd of 300 people, but he told foreign correspondents afterward that he hoped he had put the controversy behind him. During a Sept. 12 official concert in Havana that was broadcast live on national television, Carcasses sang a song calling for free access to information and the election of the president by direct popular vote. The jazz fusion artist said Monday he had been barred indefinitely from performing at future state-run events because of his comments during the concert, which had been organized to demand the release of Cuban intelligence agents imprisoned in the United States. But authorities on the Communist-ruled island later reconsidered and lifted the sanction. The 66-year-old Rodriguez, Cuba’s best-known folk singer, came to Carcasses’ defense on Tuesday. He said his fellow musician had committed a “regrettable error” in pressing his demands at an event organized to call for the release of agents “who have sacrificed their lives for the security of the people.” However, as a Cuban citizen, Carcasses “has the right to express what he thinks in his country,” Rodriguez added. Considered heroes in Cuba, the four agents were arrested in 1998 and convicted of espionage in 2001, receiving sentences ranging from 15 years to life in prison. While a fifth agent who was also arrested and convicted of the same crime has since been paroled and allowed to return to Cuba, the other four spies remain in prison. The Cuban Five insisted they were spying on Miami’s Cuban exile community, not the U.S. government. Cuba says the men were sent to Florida in the wake of several terror bombings in Havana allegedly masterminded by anti-Castro militant Luis Posada Carriles, a former CIA operative. Follow us on twitter.com/foxnewslatino

Cuban Performs With Silvio Rodríguez After Controversial Remarks At Concert

Oct. 20 Prince Royce, 5 p.m. reserved tickets priced at $20 Wed. Oct. 23 Snoop Dogg AKA Snoop Lion, 7 p.m. reserved tickets priced at $20 Thurs. Oct. 24 Alabama Shakes, 7 p.m. reserved tickets priced at $15 Fri.. Oct. 25 Zendaya, 7 p.m.